Friday, July 1, 2016

How the US government spies on journalists

As Rebecca noted this morning in "biggest domestic news of the week," there's one story you especially need to pay attention to, Cora Currier's "Secret Rules Make It Pretty Easy For The FBI To Spy On Journalists:"


The Obama administration has come under criticism for bringing a record number of leak prosecutions and aggressively targeting journalists in the process. In 2013, after it came out that the Justice Department had secretly seized records from phone lines at the Associated Press and surveilled Fox News reporter James Rosen, then-Attorney General Eric Holder tightened the rules for when prosecutors could go after journalists. The new policies emphasized that reporters would not be prosecuted for “newsgathering activities,” and that the government would “seek evidence from or involving the news media” as a “last resort” and an “extraordinary measure.” The FBI could not label reporters as co-conspirators in order to try to identify their sources — as had happened with Rosen — and it became more difficult to get journalists’ phone records without notifying the news organization first.
Yet these changes did not apply to NSLs. Those are governed by a separate set of rules, laid out in a classified annex to the FBI’s operating manual, known as the Domestic Investigations and Operations Guide, or DIOG. The full version of that guide, including the classified annex, was last made public in redacted form in 2011.
The section of the annex on NSLs obtained by The Intercept dates from October 2013 and is marked “last updated October 2011.” It is classified as secret with an additional restriction against distribution to any non-U.S. citizens.

Emails from FBI lawyers in 2015, which were released earlier this year to the Freedom of the Press Foundation, reference an update to this portion of the DIOG, but it is not clear from the heavily redacted emails what changes were actually made.



This is an important story and goes to the heart of just how dishonest Barack is.

And to how little freedom the press has in the United States.


Okay, be sure to read Wally, Cedric and Betty's joint post.





  • And to the 'concerned' e-mailer, I don't need to write with my husband (Cedric).  We do work together at Third.

    Betty and Cedric are friends and were friends before we got married.

    Betty did the original humor site.

    For her first three years, her site was an online comedic novel revolving around the character of Betina.

    Wally does a humor site.

    Cedric started doing a humor site.

    It's perfectly natural for the three of them to team up.

    That's usually because Betty has thought of something funny and tosses it to them.

    They then insist, since it was her idea, that she co-writes.

    If she can do it (when they're needing to write together), she does.

    But Betty does a lot of stuff with them.

    And, of course, C.I. is their audience.

    Wally always tested his humor posts on her.

    He and Cedric teamed up and C.I. continued to be their test audience.

    That doesn't bother me either.

    There's no jealousy or any need for it.

    I don't do humor posts.

    I love Betty's work, I love Betty.

    There's no problem with her working with her friend Cedric and her friend Wally.

    Stop worrying.


    This is C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot:"


    Friday, July 1, 2016.  Chaos and violence continue,  Falluja's 'liberated' again, the UK is sending more troops to Iraq, Iraq's Shi'ite militias are up in arms that someone would dictate to them other than the government of Iran, and much more.


    News from the United Kingdom this morning:


    Good day for British govt to 'bury news' as UK domestic politics take priority: UK to send 250 more soldiers to Iraq






    Emma Clark (SCOTSMAN) reports:

    Scores of extra British troops are being sent to Iraq to help the country in its battle against the so-called Islamic State, Defence Secretary Michael Fallon has announced.

    Mr Fallon said almost 200 additional personnel and an engineering squadron will travel to the country, bringing the total number of British personnel in Iraq to 1,100.

    A good question from Twitter:
    ON Somme anniversary: UK sends 250 more soldiers to Iraq, Total there now 1,100 Did MPs ever sanction this number..where will it lead?



    RT calls it "mission creep" for the UK.  It is mission creep for all.  Offering perspective, Dita Deboni (ONE VOICE) explains New Zealand's troops, UK troops and others:

    So despite telling us there would be no troops sent to Iraq in 2014, and then telling us there would be a deployment – but no longer than two years - in 2015, we are now told, this week, that the Iraq deployment of our ostensibly non-combat troops will go on for another 18 months.
    This announcement is not really much of a surprise, coming as it does after Barack Obama’s April announcement that the US would be sending an extra 217 troops to Iraq – as well as Apache helicopters and other more serious equipment of warfare. Days later it was announced the UK would do the same. Italy, Germany and France have all sent more troops to Iraq this year. 

    There’s a total of over 7000 US and coalition troops, including New Zealand, on the supposed “advise and assist” role in the fight against ISIS across Iraq, Syria and Libya.  And those are the ones we know about. It’s understood there are many more American troops in Iraq than publicly declared, for example, including some of the country’s air forces.



    Governments lie.

    Then they take a minute to catch their breath.

    And then they lie again.


    Now remember what Dita's talking about regarding the number of troops while we note the US Defense Dept announcement yesterday:

    Strikes in Iraq
    Bomber, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft and rocket artillery conducted 19 strikes in Iraq, coordinated with and in support of Iraq’s government:

    -- Near Baghdadi, two strikes struck an ISIL staging facility and destroyed an ISIL bunker and suppressed an ISIL tactical unit.

    -- Near Qaim, a strike struck an ISIL vehicle bomb facility.

    -- Near Beiji, a strike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL vehicles and an ISIL vehicle bomb.

    -- Near Fallujah, two strikes struck two separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed 42 ISIL vehicles and denied ISIL access to terrain.

    -- Near Habbaniyah, a strike struck a large ISIL tactical unit and destroyed 120 ISIL vehicles, an ISIL tactical vehicle and three ISIL vehicle bombs.

    -- Near Haditha, a strike struck an ISIL staging facility.

    -- Near Hit, a strike struck a large ISIL tactical unit and destroyed 13 ISIL vehicles and damaged another.

    -- Near Mosul, four strikes struck four separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed two ISIL vehicles and an ISIL supply cache.

    -- Near Qayyarah, a strike destroyed eight ISIL rocket rails and five ISIL rocket systems.

    -- Near Ramadi, a strike struck a large ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL fighting positions, two ISIL heavy machine guns, an ISIL mortar system and an ISIL staging area and damaged two ISIL fighting positions.

    -- Near Sinjar, a strike destroyed an ISIL heavy machine gun.

    -- Near Sultan Abdallah, a strike destroyed an ISIL tactical vehicle.

    -- Near Tal Afar, a strike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

    -- Near Waleed, a strike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL vehicle and two ISIL weapons caches.

    Task force officials define a strike as one or more kinetic events that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative, effect. Therefore, officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIL vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against buildings, vehicles and weapon systems in a compound, for example, having the cumulative effect of making those targets harder or impossible for ISIL to use. Accordingly, officials said, they do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target. Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike.


    These are the daily air strikes that US President Barack  Obama started in August of 2014.

    Daily.

    And, as the US government wants us to know (even though it's not true), those air strikes do not kill civilians.


    Handling the gossip column, Phil Stewart (REUTERS) passes on, "U.S.-led coalition aircraft waged a series of deadly strikes against Islamic State around the city of Falluja on Wednesday, U.S. officials told Reuters, with one citing a preliminary estimate of at least 250 suspected fighters killed and at least 40 vehicles destroyed."


    Wow, so Wednesday's strikes killed 250 fighters.

    And these strikes have taken place daily since August 2014.


    How many members does the Islamic State have in Iraq?


    Must be millions, right?


    But earlier this week, at SALON, Patrick Cockburn noted, "The Iraqi army and security forces, for example, had 350,000 soldiers and 660,000 police on the books in June 2014 when a few thousand Islamic State fighters captured Mosul, the country’s second largest city, which they still hold. Today the Iraqi army, security services, and about 20,000 Shia paramilitaries backed by the massive firepower of the United States and allied air forces have fought their way into the city of Fallujah, 40 miles west of Baghdad, against the resistance of IS fighters who may have numbered as few as 900."



    So with only a handful, approximately 30,000, in the country why are foreign forces needed?

    Didn't the Iraqi forces do a wonderful job of liberating Falluja?

    Well . . . not the first time it was announced.

    But certainly, last weekend, it had done awesome completely it's mission (if you don't count War Crimes and intimidating the civilian population), right?


    Except WORLD BULLETIN reports that a suburb of Falluja (3 miles from the heart of the city) just got 'liberated' yesterday.

    Well someday, maybe, right?

    At least Iraq is getting along with its neighbors, right?


    Well . . .

    RUDAW reports:


    The Iraqi government has asked Saudi Arabia to stop interfering in its internal affairs in a strong statement a day after the Saudi foreign minister said that the Shiite militia group known as Hashd al-Shaabi must be disbanded.

    The Iraqi ministry of foreign affairs said that “it condemns the repeated interference of the Saudi foreign ministry in Iraq’s internal affairs,” said Ahmed Jamal, the ministry spokesperson.

    The statement from Baghdad comes a day after Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister Adel Al-Jubeir said that the Shiite militia was a sectarian group backed by Iran and that it must be disbanded.



    Why would anyone be bothered by Hashd al-Shaabi?


    Ongoing War Crimes.


    1. Shia Militias crimes مليشات الشيعه قتلت 15 سني عراقي اثناء سجودهم بصلاة التراويح ببغداد ابو غريب ولم تذكرهم اي قناة



    15 Iraqi Sunni civilian killed During Thier prayers by Shia Militias in Nour mosque Abu Ghraib









    AL-MANAR reports, "The Popular Mobilization Forces in Iraq issued on Thursday a statement to blast the stances of Saudi Foreign Minister's stances which asked for decomposing the PMF units."


    Let's note Tuesday's Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing:


    Ranking Member Ben Cardin: How do you deal with the Shi'ite militia?  How do they deal with it?

    Special Envoy Brett McGurk: Well, it's a good question. First of all, Shia militias have to act under the control of the Iraqi government, the Iraqi state, that's a fundamental principle of the government of Iraq.  We think most of the Popular Mobilization Forces operate under the control of the Iraqi state but about 15 to 20% of them actually do not.  And those groups are a fundamental problem.  The number one thing we do is try to make sure they stay out of Sunni populated areas where they did cause real problems.  So in Tikrit, for example, Shi'ite militias are not inside the streets of Tikrit that's one thing that gave the population the confidence to return.  Uh, we have a principle when we support Iraqi forces in the military campaign: We will only support military forces operating strictly under Iraqi command and control.  That means that going up from the ground up an Iraqi chain of command  into a joint operations center where we're working with Iraqi commanders.  If there's a unit that's not operating under that structure, it doesn't get any support.



    If it often sounds, by the way, that Brett McGurk's statements conflict with John Kerry's, they do.

    That's why we told you awhile back, John's being shut out by the White House and Brett's the go-to-guy.  In related news, Hillary Clinton's sent out feelers to Brett about being Secretary of State should she be elected president.


    Back to the issue at hand, will the Shi'ite militias now be issuing a statement condemning Barack's Special Envoy?

    Doubt it.

    Nouri al-Maliki, when he was prime minister, banned the militias.  He made various organizations disband them or stated they could not participate in the political process.

    He did that because he feared being overthrown.

    The always oblivious Haider al-Abadi (the current US-appointed prime minister of Iraq) has no such thoughts.

    He not only allowed them back into the process, he made them a part of the government.

    They're now a part of the government that he can't control.


    And they don't take orders from anybody . . .


    Except some take orders from Iran, of course.


    And Iraq's long take orders from Iran when it came to the Ashraf refugees.















    Did John Kerry really call Iran "helpful" this week?


    Yes, he did.

    He'll hop into bed with anyone (that's why NEWSWEEK called him "the randy conspiracy buff" all those years ago -- though only the "conspiracy buff" angle was ever explored in commentaries after the fact).

    And he hopped into bed with Iran.

    Who's on top, John?

    I know this not because it was on the news (though it was).  I know this from visiting members of Congress this week.  And those who advocate for the Ashraf community -- especially from my home state -- are furious with John for that statement.

    They point out that the ones kidnapped have still not been returned and that the State Dept still provides no real information.

    But, hey, John, you got a new sex partner and at your age, that is an accomplishment.

    It doesn't help the persecuted Iranian refugees.

    Hey, John, you think they might now ask you about the man you appointed to take care of this problem?

    Your personal friend who had no experience in the area, pocketed his tax payer funded salary and then quickly went back into the private industry?

    Yeah, I'm thinking so, too, John.


    The Ashraf community.


    Background:  As of September 2013, Camp Ashraf in Iraq is empty.  All remaining members of the community have been moved to Camp Hurriya (also known as Camp Liberty).  Camp Ashraf housed a group of Iranian dissidents who were  welcomed to Iraq by Saddam Hussein in 1986 and he gave them Camp Ashraf and six other parcels that they could utilize. In 2003, the US invaded Iraq.The US government had the US military lead negotiations with the residents of Camp Ashraf. The US government wanted the residents to disarm and the US promised protections to the point that US actions turned the residents of Camp Ashraf into protected person under the Geneva Conventions. This is key and demands the US defend the Ashraf community in Iraq from attacks.  The Bully Boy Bush administration grasped that -- they were ignorant of every other law on the books but they grasped that one.  As 2008 drew to a close, the Bush administration was given assurances from the Iraqi government that they would protect the residents. Yet Nouri al-Maliki ordered the camp repeatedly attacked after Barack Obama was sworn in as US President. July 28, 2009 Nouri launched an attack (while then-US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates was on the ground in Iraq). In a report released this summer entitled "Iraqi government must respect and protect rights of Camp Ashraf residents," Amnesty International described this assault, "Barely a month later, on 28-29 July 2009, Iraqi security forces stormed into the camp; at least nine residents were killed and many more were injured. Thirty-six residents who were detained were allegedly tortured and beaten. They were eventually released on 7 October 2009; by then they were in poor health after going on hunger strike." April 8, 2011, Nouri again ordered an assault on Camp Ashraf (then-US Secretary of Defense Robert Gates was again on the ground in Iraq when the assault took place). Amnesty International described the assault this way, "Earlier this year, on 8 April, Iraqi troops took up positions within the camp using excessive, including lethal, force against residents who tried to resist them. Troops used live ammunition and by the end of the operation some 36 residents, including eight women, were dead and more than 300 others had been wounded. Following international and other protests, the Iraqi government announced that it had appointed a committee to investigate the attack and the killings; however, as on other occasions when the government has announced investigations into allegations of serious human rights violations by its forces, the authorities have yet to disclose the outcome, prompting questions whether any investigation was, in fact, carried out."  Those weren't the last attacks.  They were the last attacks while the residents were labeled as terrorists by the US State Dept.  (September 28, 2012, the designation was changed.)   In spite of this labeling, Mohammed Tawfeeq (CNN) observed that "since 2004, the United States has considered the residents of Camp Ashraf 'noncombatants' and 'protected persons' under the Geneva Conventions."  So the US has an obligation to protect the residents.  3,300 are no longer at Camp Ashraf.  They have moved to Camp Hurriyah for the most part.  A tiny number has received asylum in other countries. Approximately 100 were still at Camp Ashraf when it was attacked Sunday.   That was the second attack this year alone.   February 9th of 2013, the Ashraf residents were again attacked, this time the ones who had been relocated to Camp Hurriyah.  Trend News Agency counted 10 dead and over one hundred injured.  Prensa Latina reported, " A rain of self-propelled Katyusha missiles hit a provisional camp of Iraqi opposition Mujahedin-e Khalk, an organization Tehran calls terrorists, causing seven fatalities plus 50 wounded, according to an Iraqi official release."  They were attacked again September 1, 2013 -- two years ago.   Adam Schreck (AP) reported back then that the United Nations was able to confirm the deaths of 52 Ashraf residents.




    The situation has not been addressed.  The Ashraf community continues to be targeted.  The US government legally owes them safe passage out of Iraq.






    Thursday, June 30, 2016

    Hillary is a Menace to Society

    There's no other way to describe her:




    "Information Clearing House" - "New Observer"- A newly-released Hilary Clinton email confirmed that the Obama administration has deliberately provoked the civil war in Syria as the “best way to help Israel.”


    In an indication of her murderous and psychopathic nature, Clinton also wrote that it was the “right thing” to personally threaten Bashar Assad’s family with death.


    In the email, released by Wikileaks, then Secretary of State Clinton says that the “best way to help Israel” is to “use force” in Syria to overthrow the government.


    The document was one of many unclassified by the US Department of State under case number F-2014-20439, Doc No. C05794498, following the uproar over Clinton’s private email server kept at her house while she served as Secretary of State from 2009 to 2013.



    Get it?

    She's a danger to us all.

    Vote Jill Stein. 

    Vote anything other than Hillary.


    This is C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot:"




    Wednesday, June 29, 2016.  Chaos and violence continue, US corporate welfare continues as the White House only tosses out dimes by comparison for refugees, War Hawk Hillary is not forgotten, and much more.



    Today, the US Defense Dept announced:

    Strikes in Iraq
    Bomber, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 17 strikes in Iraq, coordinated with and in support of Iraq’s government:

    -- Near Qaim, five strikes struck two ISIL weapons caches, an ISIL finance distribution center and two ISIL communication facilities.

    -- Near Rutbah, a strike struck an ISIL vehicle bomb facility.

    -- Near Fallujah, a strike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL fighting position, an ISIL vehicle and an ISIL vehicle bomb and denied ISIL access to terrain.

    -- Near Mosul, three strikes struck two separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed two ISIL vehicles and suppressed an ISIL mortar position.

    -- Near Qayyarah, five strikes struck two separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL fighting position, two ISIL bunkers, four ISIL rocket rails, two ISIL rocket systems, an ISIL excavator, an ISIL rocket propelled grenade system and ISIL-used engineering equipment.

    -- Near Ramadi, two strikes struck two separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL vehicle.


    Task force officials define a strike as one or more kinetic events that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative, effect. Therefore, officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIL vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against buildings, vehicles and weapon systems in a compound, for example, having the cumulative effect of making those targets harder or impossible for ISIL to use. Accordingly, officials said, they do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target. Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike.


    The US government bombs Iraq daily and has since August of 2014.

    Why?

    One reason is because war is big business.



    That was made clear again today.


    UPI wrote it up like this:


     The U.S. will extend a $2.7 billion foreign military finance credit facility to Iraq under a deal announced by the U.S. Embassy in Iraq Wednesday.
    The deal, signed by U.S. Ambassador Stuart Jones and Iraqi Minister of Finance Hoshyar Zebari, will allow Iraqi security forces to defer payment for the purchase of ammunition and maintenance of its F-16 aircraft and M1A1 Abrams tanks.


    REUTERS went with this:

    Iraq secured a $2.7 billion loan from the United States on Wednesday to fund ammunition and maintenance of fighter jets, tanks and other military equipment for use in the war against Islamic State.

    Baghdad will have eight and a half years, including a one-year grace period, to repay the loan, which carries a 6.45 percent interest rate, a U.S. embassy statement said.


    There are many other ways to write it up.


    You could lead with something like:

    Despite being a bad credit risk, as evidenced by the recent IMF structure loan, the White House has decided to hand over $2.7 billion US tax dollars as a line of credit -- a line of credit that will most likely never be repaid.


    Or you might go with:

    The White House today made a gift of $2.7 billion to the US weapons industry -- a gift made with US tax dollars.


    It's welfare, plain and simple.


    It's corporate welfare.


    How many helicopters does the Islamic State have?

    That's right: zero.

    How many planes:

    Again, zero.


    But the absurd amount of $2.7 billion -- billion -- is being tossed across the globe to enrich the weapons industry -- on the tax payers' dime.


    How many members of the Islamic State are currently in Iraq?

    30,000?

    50,000?


    And 2.7 billion is what's thrown out.


    At SALON, Patrick Cockburn notes, "The Iraqi army and security forces, for example, had 350,000 soldiers and 660,000 police on the books in June 2014 when a few thousand Islamic State fighters captured Mosul, the country’s second largest city, which they still hold. Today the Iraqi army, security services, and about 20,000 Shia paramilitaries backed by the massive firepower of the United States and allied air forces have fought their way into the city of Fallujah, 40 miles west of Baghdad, against the resistance of IS fighters who may have numbered as few as 900."

    There's a refugee crisis in Iraq.


    This month, the White House also gave money to that issue.

    How many billions?

    Not billions.


    Here's the press release on that:


    June 21, 2016
    Office of the Spokesperson
    Washington, DC

    In light of recent events in Iraq, and in response to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees’ recent appeals for emergency needs in Fallujah, the United States is announcing an additional $20 million in humanitarian aid to UNHCR’s Iraq response. This will be part of a larger package of humanitarian assistance that will be announced later this year. More than 3.3 million Iraqis have been internally displaced since 2014 and more are expected to flee in the coming days and weeks. The UN estimates that about 85,000 people have already fled Fallujah. UNHCR has identified camp coordination and camp management, as well as protection, as its most urgent priorities in the Fallujah response. Other immediate needs include water and sanitation, shelter, and food. Humanitarian agencies are responding to the crisis, but more funding is urgently needed. We urge other governments to contribute generously to the UN’s Iraq appeals.



    Over 3.3 million refugees.


    And any serious attempt at 'liberating' Mosul is expected to create thousands more refugees.


    But $20 million is the ideal number.


    Again, war enriches many.

    Not the person on the ground.

    Not the civilian caught there or the soldier sent there.

    But it is big business for many.




    “There are 15 of us living in this tent.” Around 85,000 people have escaped seeking safety in camps.












    Today, UNICEF released a report entitled [pdf format warning] "A HEAVY PRICE FOR CHILDREN: VIOLENCE DESTROYS CHILDHOODS IN IRAQ" which opens:



    Iraq is now one of the most dangerous places in the world for children.
    Four decades of conflict, sanctions, violence, insecurity and economic stagnation have brought development in the country to its knees.
    At the end of 2015, Iraq had missed all, bar one, of its eight Millennium Development Goals including targets for increasing school enrolment, reducing child deaths before their fifth birthday and improving access to safe drinking water.
    The intensification of conflict since 2014 has had a catastrophic impact on children in the country. UNICEF estimates that 4.7 million children across Iraq are in need of assistance - that’s around one-third of all children in the country. Since the war began in Syria in 2011, Iraq has also been hosting more than 245,000 Syrian refugees, nearly a quarter of whom are children. Almost two thirds of Iraqi children in need are in areas beyond the control of the Government of Iraq.
    Multiple armed factions are waging war throughout the country, putting people of every ethnicity and background in danger - killing and injuring thousands, trapping civilians in cities under siege and forcing families to flee their homes.
    Massive movements of people who have been forced from their homes by fighting - many from areas cut off from aid like Fallujah - characterise the ongoing crisis. Almost ten per cent of the country’s children – more than 1.5 million – have been forced to flee their homes due to violence since the beginning of 2014, often moving multiple times to seek safety.
    According to UNICEF, 3.6 million children – one in five of all Iraqi children – are at a great risk of death, injury, sexual violence, recruitment into the fighting and abduction. This number has increased by 1.3 million in just 18 months.
    Since 2014, UNICEF has verified 838 child deaths, and 794 injuries in Iraq. The actual number is likely to be much higher. In the last year alone, 455 incidents affected more than 1,200 children.
    The large increase in the number of violations against children is largely due to the intensification of violence in the Anbar area, in the west of the country. From the first to the second half of 2015, the number of child victims of grave violations in Iraq shot up by more than five times, from 202 children in the period between January to June, to 1,020 between July and December.
    The reported abduction of thousands of children, particularly in 2014, is one of Iraq’s greatest concerns. Since the beginning of 2014, UNICEF has verified the abduction of 1,496 children in Iraq. On average, 50 children per month. Abducted girls are most at risk of sexual abuse, particularly those from religious and ethnic communities. The use of sexual violence and the brutalization of women and girls, has been well documented, with many abducted on a mass scale, held captive for months, sold into sexual slavery and subjected to rape, torture and abuse.



    A $2.7 billion line of credit could have been used to provide pre-fab school buildings or structures to Iraq.


    A $2.7 billion line of credit could have been used to provide food.


    Those are just two possibilities.


    It still would have been welfare -- government welfare -- but it would have enriched something other than the defense (war) industry.


    Of today's welfare announcement, Jason Ditz (ANTIWAR.COM) explains, "The deal is part of the US Foreign Military Finance (FMF). The same program provided Iraq with upwards of $4 billion during the previous US occupation of Iraq, though in that case the money was in grant form, and not to be paid back."  And, as Ditz points out, this 'loan' will likely be forgiven or paid with US tax payer money later given to Iraq as a grant.




    Corporate welfare  exists because so many pigs are in government.


    Take Senator Dianne Feinstein  giving contracts to her husband.  I know that not because THE NATION printed the report.  They didn't.  They killed it.  Had to protect Dianne.  Dianne was more important than telling their readers the truth.

    So the journalist had to get the report printed elsewhere.

    Click here for Peter Byrne's "Senator Feinstein's Iraq Conflict" -- the piece THE NATION didn't want you to read.

    Not everyone was as against the truth as Katrina vanden Heuvel (the person who's ruined THE NATION magazine).  For example, here's David R. Baker (SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE) reporting in 2003 on the $600 million contract that Dianne's husband was awarded.


    Here's Ken Silverstein (HARPER'S MAGAZINE), in 2009, highlighting Dianne's steering $25 billion tax payer dollars to a firm awarding her husband business.


    Here's PROJECT CENSORED on continued efforts on Dianne's part to enrich her husband (and herself -- California is a community property state).


    And, of course, War Hawk Hillary Clinton's been happy to dole out corporate welfare as well as to dole out favors to those who donate to The Clinton Foundation.


    BRussells Tribunal remains one of the finest outlet for news on Iraq and other wars.  They recently noted War Hawk Hillary.




    A leaked Hillary Clinton email confirms that the Obama administration, with Hillary at the helm, orchestrated a civil war in Syria to benefit Israel.
    YOURNEWSWIRE.COM|BY SEAN ADL-TABATABAI

    Antoine Vandendriessche, Kim McQuaite, Selma Çoban and 2 others like this.
    Comments
    Janet Anderson
    Janet Anderson Dreadful woman if this is true. How about saving the Palestinians??






    1.  Liked 38 times

      hillary destroyed libya haiti and iraq to make a buck





  • To illustrate Hillary's incompetence; Clinton as Senator voted for the greatest strategic blunder in U.S. history, the invasion of Iraq.









      Hillary Clinton.. out of touch with AMERICA and the World












     





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