Saturday, September 24, 2016

3 important topics



  1. There is only one choice on your ballot 📝 that will abolish student debt: ✔️ / 🗳
  2. When Democrats falsely claim the Greens or are Russian agents, make sure to show them this and many more images.



A large number of important topics in those Tweets.

We need to abolish student loan debt.

We need to open the debates.

And we need to end McCarthyism -- not revive it the way Hillary and her supporters are trying to do.



This is C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot:"



Friday, September 23, 2016.  Chaos and violence continue, Zebari talks conspiracy and admits he has covered up fraud and corruption, Barack Obama does not use the d-word no matter what liars like Juan Cole tell you, and much more.




Kicking things off with Hillary Clinton's disgraced colleague and good friend Hoshyar Zebaria.









The disgraced Zebari was ousted this week due to corruption.

Like a Clinton, he's not going to take defeat easily.  So yesterday, he held a press conference in Erbil, drove the BMW (Bitch Moan and Whine) around for over and hour.

now you think, so that is
the way it's gonna be
that's what this is all about
i think that that is
the way it always was
you chose not to notice until now
yeah now that there's a problem
you call me up to confide
and you go on for over an hour

'bout each one that took you for a ride
and i guess that you dialed my number
'cuz you thought for sure that i'd agree
i said baby, you know i still love you
but how dare you complain to me

-- "Napolean," written by Ani DiFranco, first appears on her DILATE



But complain he did.  Over and over again.


Mahdi Talat (REUTERS) reports Zebari has found someone to blame for his ouster: Nouri al-Maliki.  Zebari is charging a conspiracy to oust him led by Iraq's former prime minister and forever thug Nouri.

Zebari is quoated insisting, "The side that is behind the questioning and withdrawal of confidence is the State of Law and its head Nuri al-Maliki in collusion unfortunately with the speaker of parliament Saleem al-Jabouri."




And if you didn't know how bad Zebari was, look, the whore of Baghdad herself is vouching for him.



slides further into the abyss with move to unseat finance minister Zebari, one of few credible ministers and senior Kurd in government







Of course, we believe you, Jane Arraf.

I mean, you refused to report the crimes of Saddam Hussein.  Then you refused to report the crimes of Nouri al-Maliki.

You've lied throughout your career as a 'reporter.'

If you say he's golden, then we know he's . . . rusted.

And corrupt.

Which he demonstrated in the press conference.

ASHARQ AL-AWSAT reports that he "threatened to publicly expose important corruption files in the country, accusing former Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki of orchestrating his removal from office to prepare for overthrowing the government of current Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi."


They quote him declaring, "We confronted corruption at all state levels and we possess big and serious corruption files that we will send to international observers."


Excuse me.

I need to do a correction.

They quote him admitting, "We confronted corruption at all state levels and we possess big and serious corruption files that we will send to international observers."

As a public servant of Iraq, it was his duty to turn over files and evidence of corruption -- not after he gets caught himself, but when has documentation.

So Zebari is not just corrupt, he's willing to look the other way at others corruption as well -- provided they are silent about his own.

The people of Iraq are being robbed and defrauded and Zebari admits in public that he has proof of this that he has sat on but now that he's been tossed out for corruption he's willing to come forward.

Only Jane Arraf, whore of Baghdad, could Tweet in support of someone as corrupt as Zebari.


Stability built on corruption is worth nothing. Mr. Zebari had it coming.








And while Jane works a lonely street, for the firs time Abbas Kadhim and I manage to agree.  Well said, Kadhim.


The Q is: will the KDP punish Hoshyar Zebari for his corruption actions or will promote him to another higher position in Erbil or Baghdad?




,

Hillary Clinton's good friend needs to be shown the door permanently.


Yesterday, the US Defense Dept announced:




Strikes in Iraq
Attack, bomber, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft as well as rocket artillery conducted 13 strikes in Iraq, coordinated with and in support of Iraq’s government:

-- Near Baghdadi, a strike engaged an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed a repeater tower and a bunker.

-- Near Mosul, four strikes engaged four ISIL tactical units and destroyed three weapons caches and suppressed a sniper firing position.

-- Near Qayyarah, four strikes engaged three ISIL tactical units and destroyed 38 vehicles, four watercraft and a land bridge. A culvert entrance was damaged and a tactical unit was suppressed.

-- Near Ramadi, two strikes engaged an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two vehicles, two supply caches and a fuel tank.

-- Near Sultan Abdallah, a strike engaged an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed a vehicle and an artillery system.

-- Near Tal Afar, a strike engaged an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed a checkpoint.


Task force officials define a strike as one or more kinetic events that occur in roughly the same geographic location to produce a single, sometimes cumulative, effect. Therefore, officials explained, a single aircraft delivering a single weapon against a lone ISIL vehicle is one strike, but so is multiple aircraft delivering dozens of weapons against buildings, vehicles and weapon systems in a compound, for example, having the cumulative effect of making those targets harder or impossible for ISIL to use. Accordingly, officials said, they do not report the number or type of aircraft employed in a strike, the number of munitions dropped in each strike, or the number of individual munition impact points against a target. Ground-based artillery fired in counterfire or in fire support to maneuver roles is not classified as a strike.


Bombings will not run the Islamic State out of Iraq.

Driven underground is not an option for peace.


The reasons why the Islamic State received support in Iraq have to be addressed for ISIL to be defeated there.

That means ending the persecution of the Sunnis.


Nasim Ahmed (MEM) wants to join the Juan Cole club.

It's a club of stupid or lying.

Both wanted to weigh in this week on Iraq and Barack Obama.

Both insisted that the US President spoke about "D--sh."

No, he didn't, stop lying.


His full remarks appeared in Tuesday's snapshot (as did Hayder al-Abadi's but we're only reposting Barack's):





PRESIDENT OBAMA: Let me begin by just commenting on the events that have unfolded today. This morning, I talked about the fact that there was a person of interest that the FBI and law enforcement had identified with respect to the bombs that had been planted in the New York and New Jersey area. As everybody is now aware, that individual has been apprehended.
And I just want to start by commenting on the extraordinary work and coordination that's taken place between the FBI and local enforcement. For us to be able to apprehend a suspect in just a little over 24 hours after an event takes place like this, it is outstanding police work, outstanding law enforcement work.
I, in particular, want to give a heartfelt thanks to the New Jersey police officers who were able to apprehend this individual. I had a chance to talk to them briefly before I came down to my meetings here. They are going to be fine. They have sustained some modest injuries, but ones that they'll rapidly recover from. They were in good spirits. And I communicated to them how appreciative the American people were, as well as people in the region. It's just one more reminder of the extraordinary skill and sacrifice and courage of our law enforcement officers and what they put on the line every single day to make sure that we are safe.
Beyond that, obviously information is still unfolding about what might have motivated the suspect. I'm going to leave it to the FBI and local law enforcement authorities to discuss those details with you. I will also comment on the fact that, with respect to the Minnesota stabbings that occurred, I had a chance to talk to the off-duty police officer there who undoubtedly saved a lot of lives and prevented further injury because of his quick and effective action. And I told him that, once again, the American people were appreciative of his work and his heroism.
Now, one of the challenges that we face is -- in addition to being an open society in which individuals who are disturbed in some fashion can carry out violence against the American people -- the big danger we have right now is, is that we have an organization in ISIL that is actively trying to radicalize and promote extremism of this sort. In addition, they are directly carrying out and planning constant attacks not only overseas, but within Iraq and within Syria.
And so it is with great appreciation that I welcome Prime Minister Abadi here, along with his delegation. Thanks to the sacrifices of the Iraqi people and the Iraqi armed forces, since I last met with him face-to-face a year ago, we have significant progress in rolling back ISIL. They have now lost over half of the populated territory that they had gained and were still maintaining as recently as last year. And what we've seen now is just steady progress as the Iraqi security forces have gained more confidence as they have coordinated with the 67-member coalition against ISIL.
And now, what we have been discussing and what we're focusing on is to go right at the heart of the ISIL operations in Mosul. Now, this is going to be a challenging battle. Mosul is a large city, and ISIL has embedded itself deeply within that city. But because of the prepositioning of forces, because of the cooperation between the coalition and the Iraqi security forces, because of the cooperation and courage of the Kurdish Peshmerga, we feel confident that we will be in a position to move forward fairly rapidly.
Now, it will be a tough fight. And once it is initiated, one of the things that we discussed is the importance of not just driving ISIL out of Mosul but making sure that the population there that invariably is going to be displaced and will have suffered, and is going to be looking for warmth and food and water and shelter, that we are prepared to help provide rapid humanitarian assistance, and that we can rebuild the city in a way that assures not only ISIL does not come back, but extremist ideologies born out of desperation do not return.
And so a lot of our work today has been focused on making sure that that happens. I am very grateful that Prime Minister Abadi has consistently operated in a way that indicates his commitment to an inclusive Iraq that treats everybody fairly, respects human rights. And the work that we're doing with the Iraqi government will adhere to those principles, not just in the Mosul campaign, but beyond.
But this is going to be hard. This is going to be challenging and will require resources. We're going to be asking Congress to step up in support of this effort, and we're going to be asking other countries to step up in support of this effort.
And my thanks go out not only to the Iraqi forces that have borne the brunt of the progress that's been made inside of Iraq, as well as the Kurdish Peshmerga, but also obviously our outstanding men and women in uniform. Although they are not on the front lines of the fight and not involved directly in combat, it's still a dangerous area to operate. And I think Prime Minister Abadi would be the first to say that our men and women from all branches of our armed forces have operated with incredible effectiveness and courage in providing the training and the assistance that has allowed us to make these gains.
So, hopefully, by the end of this year, we will have seen further progress with respect to Mosul, and that we will continue to see further progress with respect to economic and political stabilization inside of Iraq.
Mr. Prime Minister, thank you for your good work, and thank you to all the members of your team for the excellent work that they've done, as well.



Read over the above.

Slowly, if you need to.

Where does Barack use the d-word?

He doesn't.

When Robin Morgan started her xenophobic ranting and raving and attacks on Arabs -- that's what they were, Robin, and bringing on a French Arab the next week to vouch for you didn't change the way you were seen in the Arab world -- we noted that Barack had walked away from that term.

And we noted why.

Helps to have friends in the administration.

We've also noted that Secretary of Defense Ash Carter has avoided that term and the DoD does not use it.

Brett McGurk, Barack's special envoy, sometimes uses it.

The embarrassing John Kerry always uses it.

Barack doesn't.

He had a discussion about the term and how using it could alienate Arabs who were not part of the Islamic State which is the last thing anyone wants to do when they're seeking peace and support to defeat the Islamic State.

So stop saying Barack talked about the d-word because he didn't use that slur.

He knows better.

So to the MEM piece:



The results of governing Iraq as a country of three separate nations — Sunni, Shia and Kurds — have been calamitous. The sectarian politics of Nouri Al-Maliki’s government pushed Sunni Iraqis into the clutches of extremist groups like [the Islamic State]. As hard as it may be for us to imagine, any alternative to the corruption and sectarianism of Al-Maliki’s government seemed a better option to the people of Iraq; why should they stay as part of a union where they do not have a future?
This is a bleak reminder of the challenges facing Iraq on its road to becoming a stable country once more. With Obama’s eyes focused on defeating [the Islamic State], it’s quite easy to underestimate the deep-rooted problems which allowed Iraq to become a fertile ground for extremist groups in the first place.

Despite Obama’s acclamation that Prime Minister Al-Abadi is committed to an inclusive Iraq where everybody is treated fairly and human rights are respected, the problems of sectarianism, the lack of sovereignty and prevalent corruption still loom large.


I don't think Barack's under-estimated it so much as he's got a rogue Secretary of State on his hands with John Kerry more interested in playing Secretary of Defense than doing his own job.


As for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, earlier this month she insisted no US troops would ever be "boots on the ground" again.

US troops supporting Shia militias & Iraqi army in Northern Iraq fronts, probably south of
US troops supporting Shia militias & Iraqi army in Northern Iraq fronts, probably south of






Those don't look like ballet slippers.



The following community sites updated:












  • Tuesday, September 20, 2016

    Some Tweets

    From Saturday, Isaiah's THE WORLD TODAY JUST NUTS "Hillary Explains."


    hillary explains


    We don't have to vote for Hillary, we can vote for people who actually believe in what we believe, people like Jill Stein.

    People who say voting Green is a "protest" are missing the point. We're building a national party for the people that will grow past Nov 8.


    Jill is the Green Party's presidential candidate.

    This Tweet was also interesting:

    When a party tries to shame or bully you into voting for their campaign, that's an abusive political relationship you should walk away from.


    And it reminded me of THE NATION's despicable Katrina vanden Heuvel who's turned every election into a fear match.

    I'm voting Jill.


    This is C.I.'s "Iraq snapshot:"

     
    Tuesday, September 20, 2016.  Chaos and violence continue, 2008 comes back for Hillary Clinton as her aid Sidney Blumenthal is exposed as the one whispering Barack Obama was born in Kenya, Barack meets with Hayder al-Abadi, Seth MacFarlane tries to tell America how to vote, and much more.

    In 2000, even Democrats were outraged by the way Karl Rove smeared John McCain with lies (see Richard Gooding's "The Trashing of John McCain," VANITY FAIR).


    Now it's learned that, in 2008, to help his longtime enabler Hillary Clinton, Sidney Blumenthal (a MEDIA MATTERS 'scholar') was spreading the lie that Barack Obama was born in Kenya.


    As Rebecca's  "things get worse for sidney blumenthal,"  Ruth's "Sidney Blumenthal spread lie that Pres. Obama was born in Kenya" and Kat's "Let's hope Sidney Blumenthal doesn't really beat his wife" note, former MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS DC bureau chief James Asher and Larry Johnson (NO QUARTER) have both come forward to insist that Blumenthal spread the lie to them while insisting it was true.


    When will Hillary Clinton rebuke Blumenthal?

    Or does she have no interest in healing the divisive wounds of campaign 2008?

    The polls would suggest that she could use every vote she can get.

    So why has she failed to rebuke Blumenthal?

    Oh, that's right, she doesn't make mistakes.

    Or, at least, won't admit to them until years and years after the fact.



    Also living it up in the land of fantasy, Hayder al-Abadi and Barack Obama.  The two met at Lotte New York Palace Hotel -- as Mama Cass Elliot said at Monterey, "Shhh, no rumors."  The White House issued the following transcript:
      
    PRESIDENT OBAMA: Let me begin by just commenting on the events that have unfolded today. This morning, I talked about the fact that there was a person of interest that the FBI and law enforcement had identified with respect to the bombs that had been planted in the New York and New Jersey area. As everybody is now aware, that individual has been apprehended.
    And I just want to start by commenting on the extraordinary work and coordination that's taken place between the FBI and local enforcement. For us to be able to apprehend a suspect in just a little over 24 hours after an event takes place like this, it is outstanding police work, outstanding law enforcement work.
    I, in particular, want to give a heartfelt thanks to the New Jersey police officers who were able to apprehend this individual. I had a chance to talk to them briefly before I came down to my meetings here. They are going to be fine. They have sustained some modest injuries, but ones that they'll rapidly recover from. They were in good spirits. And I communicated to them how appreciative the American people were, as well as people in the region. It's just one more reminder of the extraordinary skill and sacrifice and courage of our law enforcement officers and what they put on the line every single day to make sure that we are safe.
    Beyond that, obviously information is still unfolding about what might have motivated the suspect. I'm going to leave it to the FBI and local law enforcement authorities to discuss those details with you. I will also comment on the fact that, with respect to the Minnesota stabbings that occurred, I had a chance to talk to the off-duty police officer there who undoubtedly saved a lot of lives and prevented further injury because of his quick and effective action. And I told him that, once again, the American people were appreciative of his work and his heroism.
    Now, one of the challenges that we face is -- in addition to being an open society in which individuals who are disturbed in some fashion can carry out violence against the American people -- the big danger we have right now is, is that we have an organization in ISIL that is actively trying to radicalize and promote extremism of this sort. In addition, they are directly carrying out and planning constant attacks not only overseas, but within Iraq and within Syria.
    And so it is with great appreciation that I welcome Prime Minister Abadi here, along with his delegation. Thanks to the sacrifices of the Iraqi people and the Iraqi armed forces, since I last met with him face-to-face a year ago, we have significant progress in rolling back ISIL. They have now lost over half of the populated territory that they had gained and were still maintaining as recently as last year. And what we've seen now is just steady progress as the Iraqi security forces have gained more confidence as they have coordinated with the 67-member coalition against ISIL.
    And now, what we have been discussing and what we're focusing on is to go right at the heart of the ISIL operations in Mosul. Now, this is going to be a challenging battle. Mosul is a large city, and ISIL has embedded itself deeply within that city. But because of the prepositioning of forces, because of the cooperation between the coalition and the Iraqi security forces, because of the cooperation and courage of the Kurdish Peshmerga, we feel confident that we will be in a position to move forward fairly rapidly.
    Now, it will be a tough fight. And once it is initiated, one of the things that we discussed is the importance of not just driving ISIL out of Mosul but making sure that the population there that invariably is going to be displaced and will have suffered, and is going to be looking for warmth and food and water and shelter, that we are prepared to help provide rapid humanitarian assistance, and that we can rebuild the city in a way that assures not only ISIL does not come back, but extremist ideologies born out of desperation do not return.
    And so a lot of our work today has been focused on making sure that that happens. I am very grateful that Prime Minister Abadi has consistently operated in a way that indicates his commitment to an inclusive Iraq that treats everybody fairly, respects human rights. And the work that we're doing with the Iraqi government will adhere to those principles, not just in the Mosul campaign, but beyond.
    But this is going to be hard. This is going to be challenging and will require resources. We're going to be asking Congress to step up in support of this effort, and we're going to be asking other countries to step up in support of this effort.
    And my thanks go out not only to the Iraqi forces that have borne the brunt of the progress that's been made inside of Iraq, as well as the Kurdish Peshmerga, but also obviously our outstanding men and women in uniform. Although they are not on the front lines of the fight and not involved directly in combat, it's still a dangerous area to operate. And I think Prime Minister Abadi would be the first to say that our men and women from all branches of our armed forces have operated with incredible effectiveness and courage in providing the training and the assistance that has allowed us to make these gains.
    So, hopefully, by the end of this year, we will have seen further progress with respect to Mosul, and that we will continue to see further progress with respect to economic and political stabilization inside of Iraq.
    Mr. Prime Minister, thank you for your good work, and thank you to all the members of your team for the excellent work that they've done, as well.


    PRIME MINISTER ABADI: Thank you, Mr. President. I think [the Islamic State] is a huge threat -- a terrorist threat to the whole world, not only for Iraq. Two years ago, we had been battling [the Islamic State] to take back Baghdad. Today, we are battling [the Islamic State] in the last stronghold in Mosul. And we hope within the next few months we're going to kick [the Islamic State] out of Mosul, and we'll deliver a huge blow to what [the Islamic State] believes in. This is very important to remove this terrorist organization and to crush it. It's a very dangerous organization. It has a very dangerous ideology. It has very dangerous instruments and means of recruiting young people. It has a huge influence in the Internet and other social media. So they must be crushed on the ground, and our heroic fighters are doing that.
    Of course, the support which has been given to Iraqis by the United States and other coalition partners is very important for us in terms of training, logistical support, providing air cover to our fighters on the ground, and of course preventing [the Islamic State] from having more recruits and more financial support. This is very important. I think our next challenge is how we stop these terrorists from recruiting other young people from all over the world. I think we have listed something like 100 countries where these terrorists are coming from. Some of them are not probably disadvantaged; probably some of them are from middle-class families, some of them from families who are well off. So I think this a huge challenge for all of us -- how we can stamp out this terrorism, which is probably affecting the whole world, and not only for Iraq.
    The damage in Iraq is huge due to [the Islamic State]. But the liberation of the areas, bringing refugees back to these liberated areas is a huge reward not only for these refugees, but for every one of us. This is my job, to bring all the Iraqis together, to treat all the Iraqis the same in Iraq. Now we don’t have first-class and second-class citizens in Iraq. All Iraqis are first-class citizens, regardless of their affiliation, regardless of their religion, regardless of their sect, regardless of their ethnic origin. We treat Iraqis the same. I hope everybody in Iraq will do the same.
    There are new challenges in Iraq. [The Islamic State] has caused a lot of damage in the relationship between communities. They have killed Yezidis, they have killed Shia, they have killed Christians, they have killed Sunnis, as well. So they have even caused divisions between the same tribe in the same area. So it's a huge task, I think, on our shoulder.
    We believe in reconciliation. Mr. President, I called for national reconciliation in the day after liberation of Fallujah. And I still believe in reconciliation of the country. People have to live together. But, of course, those who have committed crimes, they have to be punished. But we have to be very careful in bringing the law. We have to follow the rule of law. And we're entitled to do that. And I think we have been managing well in the areas which have been liberated. There are excesses, which are unacceptable to us. And we are prepared, and we have the resolve to stamp them out. And we are doing this exactly.

    Thank you very much for the support that was given to Iraq. And Iraq, of course, is fighting on behalf of all the world to defeat [the Islamic State], and we will do it soon. Thank you.


    Two dopes who should be tested for doping.

    Hayder's done nothing.

    Flapped his gums, that's about it.

    Nouri al-Malki made it possible for the Islamic State to flourish in Iraq by persecuting Sunnis.  One of the things he'd done was bombed Falluja daily -- bombed the residential neighborhoods in Falluja.  Shortly after become prime minister, in September of 2016, Hayder held a press conference announcing these bombings -- legally defined War Crimes -- were stopping.

    And the next day . . .

    . . . the bombings . . .

    . . . continued.

    Hayder's a liar or someone everyone blows off.

    And to speak of the 'courage' of the security forces?

    Mosul's been held for over two years now.

    Some courage.

    And the Islamic State will not be defeated in Iraq -- or driven out -- until you stop the persecution of the Sunnis.

    Stop that and the ISIL has every reason to go elsewhere.

    To the US?

    The US government will probably have to stop bombing Muslim countries to keep the Islamic State out.  In other words, they won't keep the Islamic State out because whether it's a Democrat or a Republican in the Oval Office, we keep seeing one Muslim country after another bombed.

    But stopping the Islamic State does not appear to be the goal (certainly not with the US government using them in Syria and Libya).   And with no clearly defined goals, don't expect things to improve in Iraq.  Daniel L. Davis (POLITICO) observes:


    Despite that fearful prospect, what concerned me most was is what Yassin said about what could happen after the liberation of Mosul. This is going to be a “coalition” offensive—but the coalition isn’t one of different countries. Everyone involved is Iraqi, but they consist of the fractious, mutually mistrustful constituents—Kurdish Peshmerga, Shia militias, the mixed-sectarian bag that is the Iraqi army—of a country that could still easily fall into civil war again after ISIS is defeated. Yassin said one of his major concerns is that binding political agreements won’t be in place prior to the fighting, and if there aren’t clearly articulated limits and responsibilities for each of the attacking forces, it’s not hard to imagine Sunni militias butting heads with Shia militias during the fighting, potentially coming to blows with each other.
    The result could be an Aleppo-style quagmire.
    And there is little in place right now to prevent that. Thanks to the continuing weakness and corruption of the Iraqi government, there is presently no central command authority for the operation to recapture Mosul. Thus, while optimistic press releases coming from U.S. military and government sources give the impression that the looming battle of Mosul “is the end game in Iraq,” the truth is far different. Rather than marking the end of the war in Iraq, the fall of Mosul— if it even happens—is likely to mark the beginning of the next nasty conflict.



    Who is Josh Lederman?

    Either AP's hiring comedy writers or Josh is the hardest worker in the bordello.

    Monday morning, he insisted, "Increasingly, and not without irony, Iraq has become the bright spot in Obama's campaign against the Islamic State group, though profound challenges remain."

    The War Crimes and persecution of the Sunni people apparently do not matter.

    Iraqi Sunni civilians burned tortured and killed by shia militias backed by Iran in IRAQ





    It's a bright spot!

    Of blood apparently.

    He goes on to quote Ben Rhodes (Barack's deupty on national security) insisting, "We've always believed that progress on the battlefield needs to be accompanied by continued political progress among Iraq's different communities."


    Have you always believed it, Ben?

    Because the White House has bombed Iraq every day since August 2014.

    But you've done nothing to make demands on the Iraqi government to become inclusive.


    And with cash and weapons being handed over, the White House was in the position to make demands.

    They were also in the position to infuse Iraq with a diplomatic surge but they chose not to do that as well.

    Instead, they stood by as Sunnis were persecuted, targeted and slaughtered.





    For AP, this is what 'success' looks like.


    1 in 10 children is displaced in . They live in camps like this one near Fallujah.







    Moving over to the topic of whistle-blower Ed Snowden, the film SNOWDEN is now in theaters.






    Immerse yourself in the captivating story of , with & , NOW PLAYING. Tix:



    . praises 's cinematic achievements in :



    Movie review: 'Snowden' is best Oliver Stone film in years















    The Oliver Stone directed film stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Ed Snowden.  Ava and my piece at THIRD went up early this morning "MEDIA: Fred Kaplan and other Scurrilous Whores."


    Two things.  1) Why is it up?  We're not waiting any longer.  We wrote this on Sunday and THIRD's still not ready to publish.  We need to note Ed in snapshots, we need this up now and THIRD's audience is more likely to go to the movies during the week than on the weekend so it needs to be up now. 2) We're not critiquing the film.  It's a good film, it's riveting, we say that in our piece.  But this is about media and it's about how films with messages that institutions don't like get attacked.


    Amnesty International notes:


    Edward Snowden is a hero not a traitor

    He stood up for our rights, prompting a global debate on mass surveillance that changed the world – yet he faces decades in prison for it.

    When Edward Snowden shared US intelligence documents with journalists in June 2013, he revealed the shocking extent of global mass surveillance. He showed how governments were secretly scooping up huge chunks of our personal communications, including private emails, phone locations, web histories and so much more. All without our consent.
    His courage changed the world. He sparked a global debate, changing laws and helping to protect our privacy. Edward Snowden is a human rights hero, yet he faces decades in prison under charges that treat him like a spy who sold secrets to enemies of the USA.
    Please sign our petition, which we have launched in partnership with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Pardon Snowden campaign.

    Tell President Obama to pardon Edward Snowden, a whistleblower who acted solely in the public interest. 

    Dear President Obama
    When Edward Snowden shared US intelligence documents with journalists in 2013, he did so because he believed that the government and citizens of his country – and the world – needed to confront the truth. That truth was the existence of a global mass surveillance system deployed by governments to spy on our personal communications, including private emails, phone locations, web histories and more.
    In choosing to share this information, Edward Snowden prompted a global debate, changing laws and helping to protect our privacy. For the first time in nearly 40 years, the USA passed laws to restrict government surveillance. Globally, technology companies including Apple and WhatsApp, are now doing more to protect our personal information.

    None of this would have happened without Edward Snowden. Former US Attorney General Eric Holder admitted that Snowden “performed a public service”. Even you, Mr President, have said that this debate about surveillance “will make us stronger”. And yet, Edward Snowden still faces decades in prison under laws that equate whistleblowing in the public interest with selling secrets to enemies of the USA.

    I am confident that history will remember Edward Snowden for the reforms he helped bring about. But there is no need to wait for history’s judgement.
    President Obama, I call on you to pardon Edward Snowden, a whistleblower who acted solely in the public interest. 



    Sadly, not everyone's supporting Ed Snowden.


    So won a Pulitzer Prize for publishing info provided, but now they won't stand up for him?







    Jill Stein does see Ed Snowden as a whistle-blower.  She's the Green Party's presidential candidate.




    Dr. Jill Stein Retweeted Seth MacFarlane
    Remember: voting for "lesser evil" has gotten you the worst 2 candidates ever. Stop blaming people who are resisting this downward spiral.
    Dr. Jill Stein added,






    Poor Seth.  It's exactly that kind of thinking that makes FAMILY GUY the longest running animated program on Fox never to win an Emmy.  Oh, well, it's only been on for 15 seasons -- maybe someday, eh, Seth?


    If Hillary Clinton can't get enough votes, that's on her.

    If she doesn't earn your vote, that's on her.

    Your vote is no one's vote but your own.

    You can vote or not vote.

    If you vote, you can vote for whomever you want.

    No one else owns your vote.

    If the electoral college chooses to award the election to someone other than Hillary, that's on her.

    And if Seth's so damn worried about voting, he should be calling for an amendment to abolish the electoral college.

    You know why that call's not being made by the Republican and Democratic parties, right?  It lets them take states like California, New York and Texas for granted.  They don't have to run real campaigns.

    We don't have one-person, one-vote in this country.  We vote in elections and then the electoral college votes for us.

    Seth's not worried about that.

    But he does want to lie and tell you a vote for Gary Johnson or Jill Stein is a vote for Donald Trump.

    No, it's not.

    A vote for Donald Trump is a vote for Donald Trump.

    A vote for Hillary Clinton is a vote for Hillary Clinton.

    A vote for Jill Stein is a vote for Jill Stein.

    A vote for Gary Johnson is a vote for Gary Johnson.

    A vote for Jerry White is a vote for Jerry White.

    A vote for Gloria La Riva is a vote for Gloria La Riva.

    Etc.

    When you leave the issue of legalizing pot, you leave the only political issue Seth understands.

    Vote for who you want.

    (Or don't vote.)

    Just don't take marching orders from Seth.  He's so dated and boring that even the rumors that he's gay have died (not unlike his career -- Fox learned the hard way it couldn't build a night around Seth's programs).  And at some point, he will have to deal with the charges of racism.



    If you are voting for Hillary, be proud of your vote.  But listen to someone like Cher.


    Oct so busy😱Going back out 4 Hillary,Going 2Canada 2speak about our animal-rescue Charity. Then announcement,LA & Round-Table Discussion NY






    Seth likes to pretend he's down with Hillary but no one twisted his arm into doing an episode of FAMILY GUY where he called Bill Clinton a pig f**ker, or have we all forgotten that?


    That's about Seth's level when it comes to politics.

    So if you're a proud Hillary supporter, good for you.  But listen to someone with a lot more wisdom -- Cher and not Seth.
















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